January 2021

My Brother JackMy Brother Jack, winner of the Miles Franklin Award in 1964, tells the semi autobiographical story of the character David Meredith, interspersed with references to the life of his brother Jack. The book follows the life of a boy growing up in a working class suburb in Melbourne between World War 1 and World War 2. The backdrop for the story is the impact of World War 1, the Depression, and towards the end of the book, World War 2, when David, the main character, becomes a war correspondent.
We follow David through his school years, early working life including dabbling in an artistic career before his interest in writing is recognised and he pursues a career in journalism.
Johnston presents David as a self-doubting, almost unreliable character, given many opportunities to become ‘the golden boy’, when compared to the reliable and confident character of Jack even through all his setbacks Jack experiences.
Jack knows his way, while David dabbles in art, writing, marriage and suburban life before his extensive travelling overseas.
My Brother Jack was written while Johnston was living a creative and expatriate life on the Greek Island of Hydra from where he used the book to question many social norms and beliefs that were present within Australian culture at the time.
The book was well received by the group, and appeared to be an enjoyable read, and in many cases re-read by group members.

Ratings: Pauline 4, Margie 4.5, Dianne 4, Viv 4.5, Jenny 4.5, Nicola 4, Sandy 4, Janet 4, Kim 4.5.

Our next meeting will be at Preece House on 8/02/21 at 6:30PM to discuss Exploded View by Carrie Tiffany. Hope to see you all there and happy reading!

About Us

We are a group that gets together once a month to discuss good books. Each of us gets to choose a book on a rotational basis, preferably one outside our personal comfort zone – we try to keep the trash to ourselves. After the discussion, we comment on other books we read that month. Most of the time we remain friends after the meeting.

Preece HouseWe normally meet at the 1948 heritage Preece House, 50 Nerang St Bischof Pioneer Park, Nerang (next to 54 Nerang St. shops. This venue has no toilet but here’s one in the park) on the second Monday of every month from 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. excluding Public Holidays. A small contribution is required towards the rent of the room, but not if you are a first timer. The amount depends on the number of people attending.
One book title is chosen each month and we all read that book. There is a ‘host’ who introduces and co-ordinates the discussion. The role of host is rotated around the group so that each member has the opportunity to nominate their book (it could also be an author, theme or genre). The host also acts as chairperson for that meeting.
Although we are not a social club (we are readers), we occasionally attend literary events, relevant movies or plays here at the Gold Coast, Brisbane or Byron Bay. We conform to basic meeting practices and everyone has an equal opportunity to express their opinion. Everyone’s interpretation is valid, as long as it’s expressed respectfully.
We welcome any new members who share our aims and are happy to contribute to our group. Newcomers are not required to have read the book to attend the first meeting and no contribution is required from them.
Feel free to have a look at our Booklist for 2021 and Newsletters in the sidebar. If you are reading this blog in a mobile device, switch to desktop view.

CONTACT DETAILS

We meet from 6:30 to 8:30 PM on the 2nd Monday of every month at the heritage listed Preece House located at Bischof Park, Nerang Street (next corner White St), Nerang next door to shops at 54 Nerang Street. While the Covid19 restrictions are on, we will meet online. Please contact us for info on meetings that fall on Public Holidays.
For more information use the contact form.
 

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